EARTH

INVEST IN: THE SOIL WE STAND

This month, we invest into not-for-profit organisation, Kiss the Ground, a collective of activists with a mission to awaken people to the possibilities of regeneration and inspire participation in the regenerative movement. There is extraordinary potential in the layers beneath our feet.

Over the past 150 years, the amount of carbon in the atmosphere has increased by 30%, the effect of which, scientists believe, is rising global temperatures. Soils contain approximately 75% of the carbon pool on land and therefore play a major role in maintaining a balanced global carbon cycle.

Sadly, industrial agriculture practices have dramatically increased the speed at which agricultural soils are eroding, throwing this delicate balance out of whack. Half of the topsoil on the planet has been lost in the last 150 years and less soil means less carbon sequestration.

Luckily for us there is a solution. Regenerative agriculture and land use practices that rebuild soil organic matter and restore degraded soil biodiversity can significantly increase the sequestration of CO2 in the soil. Kiss the Ground, an NGO based in Venice, California, is dedicated to creating media and educational curriculum to raise awareness about the importance of soil. They also actively work to restore soils by working with brands to leverage resources for farmers to move towards more regenerative practices.

“If the soil is not alive, or if it has been killed by tilling, chemicals, or pesticides, then carbon gets rereleased into the atmosphere instead of being stored in the soil as organic matter.”

So, what does soil carbon sequestering actually mean, and how does this relate to climate change?

The easiest way to answer this is to take four minutes and watch The Soil Story,www.thesoilstory.com. Plants take in carbon dioxide, sunlight, and water. Carbon dioxide is converted into carbohydrates, and those sugars are pumped into the soil life, which includes bacteria, fungi, and all the things that are alive that we can only see under a microscope. If the soil is not alive, or if it has been killed by tilling, chemicals, or pesticides, then carbon gets rereleased into the atmosphere instead of being stored in the soil as organic matter,” explains one Kiss the Ground activist.

In addition to educating lawmakers, leaders, farmers and students, Kiss the Ground is focusing on the ground up, per say, with the release of a curriculum for seventh-grade students.

“It is important to start with our children and build a generation that understands we are all connected.”

 

For further information and to become a Soil Advocate, visit here.

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